Dec 212011
 

We are a network of d/Deaf and hard of hearing health professionals who share information and support. As the site develops, it will include more practical information about strategies and equipment to enable us to work in healthcare and discussion of issues such as training and employment. This will also be relevant for our trainers, supervisors and employers, occupational health staff, audiologists, hearing therapists, ENT staff and other related professions. And you can contact me for advice and information.

Jul 222014
 
UKHPHL discussion group temporarily on hold.
Update: 23/07/2014. 5quidhost support has done wonders and we’re back in action!

Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail, MSNand Live have been tightening up their spam settings, which causes problems for legitimate groups like ours. I had a mountain of bounce messages from them yesterday. I think it means that group messages haven’t got through to anyone with these addresses since a message at about 8:25 yesterday morning. This happened a month ago and my web provider was able to change settings, so I’m getting back to them today. But I don’t know if it’s going to work. Or if it does work, whether it will keep happening.

In the meantime, I think it’s best not to send messages please as they won’t get through to a little under half the group. Thanks. Continue reading »

Jun 142014
 

I’ve been wondering about our name. As well as not being the snappiest of names, “UK Health Professionals with Hearing Loss” isn’t how everyone would like to be described. So, what other suggestions do you have?

Lisa and I anguished over the name when we first set the group up. Both of us were fairly recently deaf so didn’t know the nuances and tensions there have been in the d/Deaf/HoH community/ies. Continue reading »

Aug 182013
 

There’s no “one size fits all” solution, especially with stethoscopes. But that also goes for other equipment such as assisted listening devices that can be even more expensive. So do your best to agree a trial period with the supplier. This means you can get a full refund if you return the equipment in time,though delivery costs may not be included. Continue reading »

Aug 182013
 

“As well as giving advice and information to disabled people and employers, Access to Work pays a grant … towards any extra employment costs that result from a disability.”

We can get some help towards costs of special equipment, which can include electronic stethoscopes and aids to help us in meetings and with telephones and pagers, and support workers such as note-takers, lip-speakers and interpreters to sign, for example.

Access to Work may fund the full cost of equipment if you apply while out of work, are about to begin  a new job or if you apply within 6 weeks of starting a new job or are self-employed. In other situations, they only fund a proportion.

They will not fund in retrospect. You must apply and have an assessment before buying equipment or services.

Dec 222012
 

I posted before about using live speech-to-text reporting (aka “live captioning”) in meetings, theatre and indeed anywhere we d/Deaf and hard of hearing health professionals are working. Well, how about using it to help our deaf and hard of hearing patients?

Helen Cherry, a hearing aid wearer and NHS professional herself, uses remote captioning for work meetings. Then her own experience as a patient gave Cherry the idea of using it the other way round. How about our deaf and hard of hearing patients having access to remote captioning so they can “hear” their own healthcare staff? Continue reading »

Nov 012012
 

The site is being redeveloped and I apologise that many of the links and some information need to be updated. I am working on it. Do let me know when you find something that is broken. Updated information would be an added bonus! And tell me what other information you would like to find here. What topics will be useful?

Most pages have a link to leave a comment or you can use the contact form to get in touch with me directly.

Nov 012012
 

I’m developing the site substantially over the coming year. While this is happening, some of the navigation is probably going to be a bit haphazard. You’ll find some pages using the main menu bar near the top of the page and the sub-menu on the left. Others from the links under “Categories” in the sidebar on the right. I recommend you looking under both as they don’t link to the same pages. You can also use the search facility. I’m sorry for the inconvenience. At the moment, my priority is to get the information online somewhere as soon as possible. Streamlining navigation will take longer.

Dec 222011
 

What can we do in the operating theatre where face masks prevent us lip-reading, the surgeon is looking down so we can’t see their face, or there’s too much background noise? Transparent face masks can help (awaiting link for further information). As can radio aids (also awaiting link.)

Amanda Mooneyham, a medical student in the US, is using live captioning* so she is able to take an active part in the learning situation in theatre, on an equal footing with her hearing colleagues. Continue reading »